Jimmie Rodgers Music Festival - Saturday Featuring Wynonna & The Big Noise + More

JIMMIE RODGERS FOUNDATION PRESENTS

Jimmie Rodgers Music Festival - Saturday Featuring Wynonna & The Big Noise + More

Reckless Kelly, Brandy Clark, Hayes Carll, Chris Knight, Lydia Loveless, Charlie Worsham

Sat · May 6, 2017

Doors: 12:00 pm / Show: 1:00 pm

$35.00 - $40.00

Rain or Shine. No Refunds.

Children Under 10 Receive Free Entry.

Gates Open at 12:00pm.

Wynonna & The Big Noise
Wynonna & The Big Noise
Respected by the millions of fans who are drawn to her music and undeniable talent, Wynonna’s rich and commanding voice has sold over 30-million albums worldwide spanning her remarkable 33-year career. Once dubbed by Rolling Stone as “the greatest female country singer since Patsy Cline,” this iconic performer has received over 60 industry awards, with countless charting singles, including 20 No.1 hits such as “Mama He’s Crazy,” “Why Not me,” and “Grandpa, (Tell Me ‘Bout The Good Ole Days).”
Wynonna and her band The Big Noise, led by her husband/drummer/producer, Cactus Moser, released their debut full-length album in February 2016 via Curb Records to critical acclaim. Wynonna has described the new sound as “vintage yet modern” and a “return to the well.” It’s a rootsy work encompassing country, Americana, blues, soul and rock. The album features special guests Derek Trucks, Jason Isbell, Susan Tedeschi and Timothy B Schmit. NPR’s Ann Powers noted that “With her tight band behind her after touring together for several years, she just sounds like she’s home…You can just feel the grin on her face.”
Reckless Kelly
Reckless Kelly
Understanding the virtuosity of Reckless Kelly requires the perspective of where the band has been. Cody and Willy Braun grew up in the White Cloud Mountains of Idaho. They moved to Bend, Oregon, and then migrated to that great musical fountainhead, Austin, Texas.
The band’s co-founders and frontmen toured the country as part of their father’s band, Muzzie Braun and the Boys, as children. They performed on The Tonight Show twice. Their father taught his four sons a professional ethic – integrity, persistence, hard work and professionalism – honed over three generations. They overcame hardships, struggled for recognition, and learned the lessons of the trial and error that defined them.
In one sense, it’s remarkable in the way of any musician, athlete, or businessperson who bucks the odds.
In another, though, it’s utterly natural that Reckless Kelly, born in the dreams of the two Braun brothers and their heritage but nurtured in the bumpy road of maturity, became the very essence of Americana music in all its far-flung glory.
“We came along in that second wave of the movement,” Cody Braun says. “Son Volt’s album Trace had a major effect on us. People like Joe Ely, Ray Kennedy and Robert Earl Keen were always big supporters. Our goal was to make music that had a country vibe but a solid rock edge.”
In the end, all the recipe required was to just add water. Water facilitates life. It enriches the soul.
As Music Row magazine proclaimed, “In my perfect world, this is what country radio would sound like.”
“This” is Reckless Kelly. 
Brandy Clark
Brandy Clark
Washington-born and bred singer/songwriter Brandy Clark released her highly anticipated second album, Big Day in a Small Town, in June 2016 on her new major label home, Warner Bros. Records. Produced by Jay Joyce (Eric Church, Cage the Elephant), the album debuted in the Top Ten on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart and secured a place on Rolling Stone’s “45 Best Albums of 2016 So Far” and “25 Best Country & Americana Albums of 2016 So Far” lists while its lead single, “Girl Next Door,” was named one of TIME’s “Best Songs of 2016 So Far” as well as landing on “best of” lists from American Songwriter, Entertainment Weekly, Billboard and NPR. The Associated Press described the album as “gritty and visceral” while The Memphis Commercial Appeal boasted it was “the best album by any woman across the country continuum over the past decade” and Garden & Gun named her “...currently the best songwriter in Nashville.” Clark received two 2017 GRAMMY nominations for Best Country Album (Big Day in a Small Town) and Best Country Solo Performance (“Love Can Go To Hell”).
It was as a songwriter that the now six-time GRAMMY nominee first came to the music world’s attention. After graduating from Belmont University in Nashville, Clark’s talent at transforming her unique perspective on the world into song quickly brought her to the attention of Music City’s songwriting community where she often co-wrote with tunesmiths Shane McAnally, Kacey Musgraves, Trevor Rosen, Jessie Jo Dillon and others. Keith Urban, Darius Rucker, Reba McEntire, Sheryl Crow, Toby Keith, LeAnn Rimes, Gretchen Wilson, Craig Morgan and more were among the artists who have recorded her songs. Miranda Lambert took “Mama’s Broken Heart” all the way to No. 1 (earning Clark’s first GRAMMY nomination for Best Country Song in 2013), which was soon repeated by The Band Perry’s recording of “Better Dig Two.” Cleveland.com/The Plain Dealer referred to Clark as “the best wordsmith in Nashville right now...”
But Clark’s original dream was to be an artist herself. So in October 2013, she quietly released her debut project, 12 Stories, on Texas indie label Slate Creek Records...and her voice was heard loudly! The Boston Globe wrote that “in a bountiful year for female country singer/songwriters, Clark was at the head of the class, mining deep veins and yielding lyrical insights from the smallest moments in life that bind us together” and named it the best album of 2013, as did New York Magazine, NPR, and The New York Post. 12 Stories also appeared on year-end best-of lists in Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, and The Los Angeles Times, which called it “the country debut of the year.”
Clark was named Music Row Magazine's 2014 Breakthrough Artist of the Year and won a Country Music Association Award for Song of the Year (along with co-writers McAnally and Musgraves) for writing Musgraves’ hit “Follow Your Arrow.” She also received a second CMA nomination in the Best New Artist category. This was followed in 2015 with two Academy of Country Music Award nominations: Song of the Year for writing “Follow Your Arrow” and Female Vocalist of the Year.
At the 2015 GRAMMY Awards, Clark earned two nominations: the all-genre Best New Artist Award and Best Country Album for 12 Stories. And while she didn’t receive either award, she won the attention of millions of viewers due to her intimate performance of “Hold My Hand” with Dwight Yoakam on the nationally televised broadcast. “Hold My Hand” would later receive a 2016 GRAMMY nomination for Best Country Song.
As her success grew, the artist TIME called “...one of country’s driving forces” became a regular presence on television, appearing on “Late Show with David Letterman,” “Ellen,” “Good Morning America,” “The Talk,” “Late Night with Seth Meyers,” “Live with Kelly,” “Front and Center,” “ACM: Duets” and more.
It’s not just about writing and recording for Clark though – it’s also about that live experience when she performs for an audience. As NPR’s Jacob Gantz noted, “Clark’s gift as a performer is making any room – even a newsroom on a cold, rainy spring afternoon – feel as warmly human.” She opened for Loretta Lynn at the world famous Ryman Auditorium in Nashville and toured with superstar artists such as Eric Church on his “The Outsiders World Tour” (including a sold-out show at New York City’s Madison Square Garden), with Alan Jackson on his “25th Anniversary Tour,” and with friend and frequent co-writer Jennifer Nettles on the “CMT Next Women of Country Music Tour.” She performed in both Dublin and at the O2 in London as part of the 2015 “C2C Festival” and is set to return to the UK on her own in September 2016 to perform at venues in London, Birmingham, and Manchester, England as well as in Glasgow, Scotland.
Now, with the release of Big Day in Small Town, Clark is “...handling her transformation from behind-the-scenes songwriter to woman in the spotlight pretty effortlessly” according to The Los Angeles Times. “Music Row songwriting doesn’t get any better,” said US Weekly while SPIN called it “aggressive and big-grinned...designed to move people and make them feel things.” The Guardian wrote, “Clark’s music speaks to a vast audience who weren’t hearing themselves in country. She writes songs for the workers who keep America spinning, the overburdened mothers putting themselves last, the women in middle age struggling to reconcile their faith with their need for relief, be it romantic or chemical.”
Perhaps Rolling Stone sums it up best with this observation that Clark reaches a wide audience with her music that is “tooled alternately for stadiums and songwriting circles, commercial and public radio, line-dance bars and coffee shops.”
Hayes Carll
Hayes Carll
I'm a singer-songwriter.

I think "Lovers and Leavers" comes closer to reflecting that than any other record I've made.

I didn't worry about checking boxes, making sure there was something here for everybody, or getting on the radio.

I just took some much needed deep breaths and let them out on tape.

It's been a while since my last album by some measurements of time. Not "history of the universe time", or "getting a bill through congress time", but in the lives of dogs and recording artists, five years and fifty-three days is only a little less than an eternity.

I went through a divorce. I fell in love.

Changes were made, realizations were realized, and life was lived.

But, I kept on writing songs, on my own and with a cast of accomplished characters who combined their own stories and perspectives with mine.

Songs about my friends.

Songs about my son.

Songs about beginnings and endings.

Songs about songs.

Songs about acceptance and regret.

Songs about lovers and leavers.

With these songs in hand, I needed a co-conspirator to help me get them to you.

I called on Joe Henry, a gentleman poet and an elegant artist who seemed a trustworthy steward for my collection.

We recorded this record live in five days, using just an acoustic guitar, a mix of bass, percussion, pianos and organs, and a touch of pedal steel.

I didn't have one song that I knew would be a sing along or would make people dance. I felt vulnerable in a way that I hadn't in a long time. But I got what I wanted – a record with space, nuance, and room to breathe. It felt right for my art. It felt right for my life.

"Lovers and Leavers" isn't funny or raucous. There are very few hoots and almost no hollers.

But it is joyous, and it makes me smile.

No, it's not my "Blood on the Tracks," nor is it any kind of opus.

It's my fifth record — a reflection of a specific time and place.

It is quiet, like I wanted it to be.

Like I wanted to be.



Hayes Carll

January 1, 2016

Austin, TX.
Chris Knight
Chris Knight
Ten years and five acclaimed albums into one of the most uncompromising careers in American music, the singer/songwriter whose work has been compared to Prine, Cash and Nebraska-era Springsteen by some the toughest music writers in America may have finally conquered his most demanding critic of all: himself.

“Right now, this is my favorite record,” Chris Knight says of his new album, Heart Of Stone. “It might just be my best. For some reason, there’s a cohesiveness here that’s not like anything I’ve done before. But at the same time, it’s not real predictable. There’s a lot of texture to it as well, but it’s a simple record. I don’t know how that happened. But I know it when I hear it.”

Then again, Knight has always been an artist of fierce instinct and uncommon paradox. A former strip-mine reclamation inspector, Knight still lives in the rural coal town of Slaughters, Kentucky (population 200) where he was born and raised. But it’s been on record – as well as everywhere from rowdy Texas roadhouses to hushed New York City theaters – where Chris has forged the reputation for a stark and often-ferocious honesty that led one writer to call his music “where Cormac McCarthy meets Copperhead Road.”

“I still don’t know what to call myself,” says Chris. “When people ask me what kind of music I play, I tell ‘em my music is country and rock and folk and roots rock and even pop. I think this album sounds that way, too.” Produced by Dan Baird (of Georgia Satellites fame, as well as producer of Knight’s widely-praised A Pretty Good Guy and The Jealous Kind discs), the 12 songs on Heart Of Stone represent a creative maturity unlike anything Knight has done before. The music itself is a richly organic sonic mosaic where snarling guitars and pounding drums live alongside mournful violas, plucky banjos, B-3 organ and even the occasional trombone and bouzouki. And for an artist known for his narratives about busted lives and broken dreams, Knight’s new songs now carry a hard-fought wisdom that gives his characters deeper seams of pain, pride and ultimately, hope. “I’m conscious that I know a lot more than I did 7 or 8 years ago,” Chris says. “Lately I’ve been writing about more internalized thoughts and situations, about what I feel rather than maybe tell a story. I can’t keep playing the same thing or telling the same stories in different ways. Getting comfortable with what you do is a big part of it, I guess. I wasn’t afraid to say what I think, play what I play, or put what I want on this record.”

“These are the songs of a grown man,” says producer Dan Baird, “and it’s not just the lower body count. Chris is much more comfortable with his voice, his writing and the recording process than he’s ever been before. He wanted to make a really lowdown record, kind of like a rock band playing these really rural songs. And I wanted to try anything to get as much of who Chris is now on the record as possible.” Baird, who co-wrote 4 of the album’s songs, took a wholly organic approach to letting Knight and the musicians find the songs in the studio. “We set up a small drum kit, 2 amps and a little p.a. in one corner for Chris and the band to flesh-out the songs together. So rather than do a chart, put on headphones and make a mess of it while we tried to figure out why Chris wanted to kick every ass in the room, we all tried different stuff until we found the feel he was looking for. It was kind of a Blind Man’s Bluff and Easter Egg Hunt rolled into one sometimes, but when we got it right we’d jump to our
positions and record it. We knew it when we heard it.”

The unpredictable power and texture of Heart Of Stone makes itself clear with “Homesick Gypsy,” the potent opening track driven by parade drums, slide guitar, trombone, banjo and bouzouki. “Hell Ain’t Half Full” is a razor-edged rocker with an unflinchingly fierce moral core. “Almost There” is a sinister snarl of hard-luck, while “Another Dollar” explodes with vicious guitars and Chris’ surprisingly howling vocals. There’s a mournful strength to “Danville”, hardcore regret in “Miles To Memphis” and a coming-out-of-the dark joy to “Maria”. He delivers both sides of love-gone-wrong with the unexpected optimism of “Something To Keep Me Going” and the haunting pain of “My Old Cars”. Knight is at the peak of his storytelling power with “Crooked Road”, an elderly miner’s heartbreaking elegy to “good dreams gone cold” filled with love, loss, doubt and faith. But it’s the album’s title track that may be most unforeseen tale of all, in which broken promises and a broken home cannot break a struggling man’s resolve. And while the album’s closer “Go On Home” may seem like a taciturn mission statement, Chris’s plainspoken standpoint is tempered with tenacity, acceptance and a defiant wisdom. “They’re all pretty hard-nosed songs,” Chris admits. “But it’s as unified as collection as I’ve ever recorded. People may not always agree with the attitude of my music, but my point of view has always been pretty clear. With this album, it’s probably more visible. I want to be able to stand on stage singing these songs and have people believe that what I’m saying is the way that I feel.”

For fans, critics and even Knight himself, this record is the one where it all comes together. It’s an album that is alternately raw and rocking, quietly powerful and significantly truthful in its scope. Most of all, Heart Of Stone is the sound of a remarkable artist coming into his own.
You’ll know it when you hear it.
Lydia Loveless
Lydia Loveless
Blessed with a commanding, blast-it-to-the-back-of-the-room voice, the 25-year-old Lydia Loveless was raised on a family farm in Coshocton, Ohio—a small weird town with nothing to do but make music. With a dad who owned a country music bar, Loveless often woke up with a house full of touring musicians scattered on couches and floors. She has turned this potential nightmare scenario (eww….touring musicians smell…) into a wellspring of creativity.

When she got older, in the time-honored traditions of teenage rebellion, she turned her back on these roots, moved to the city (Columbus, OH) and immersed herself in the punk scene, soaking up the musical and attitudinal influences of everyone from Charles Bukowski to Richard Hell to Hank III.

Loveless's Bloodshot debut album Indestructible Machine combined heady doses of punk rock energy and candor with the country classicism she was raised on and just can't shake; it was a gutsy and unvarnished mash-up. It channeled ground zero-era Old 97s (with whom she later toured) but the underlying bruised vulnerability came across like Neko Case's tuff little sister. Indestructible Machine possesses a snotty irreverence and lyrical brashness that's an irresistible kick in the pants.

On her second Bloodshot album Somewhere Else, released after a few 7″ singles and an EP, Loveless was less concerned with chasing approval – she scrapped an entire album's worth of material before writing the set – and more focused on fighting personal battles of longing and heartbreak, and the aesthetic that comes along with them. While her previous album was described as "hillbilly punk with a honky-tonk heart" (Uncut), this one couldn't be so quickly shoehorned into neat categorical cubbyholes. No, things were different this time around—Loveless and her band collectively dismissed the genre blinders and sonic boundaries that came from playing it from a safe, familiar place. Creatively speaking, ifIndestructible Machine was an all-night bender, Somewhere Else was the forlorn twilight of the next day, when that creeping nostalgia has you looking back for someone, something, or just… anything.

2016's Real is one of those exciting records where you sense an artist truly hitting their stride, that their vision is both focused and expansive, and that their talent brims with a confident sense of place, execution and exploration. Whether you've followed Lydia's career forever, like us, or if you are new to her ample game, Real is gonna grab your ears.

On her first two Bloodshot albums, there were fevered comparisons to acknowledged music icons like Loretta Lynn, Stevie Nicks, Replacements, and more. She's half this, half that, one part something else. We hate math. But, now Real and Lydia Loveless are reference points of their own. Genre-agnostic, Lydia and her road-tightened band pull and tease and stretch from soaring, singalong pop gems, roots around the edges to proto-punk. There are many sources, but the album creates a sonic center of gravity all its own.

Always a gifted writer with a lot to say, Lydia gives the full and sometimes terrifying, sometimes ecstatic force of the word. Struggles between balance and outburst, infectious choruses fronting emotional torment are sung with a sneer, a spit, or a tenderness and openness that is both intensely personal and universally relatable. It is, as the title suggests, real.

Lydia Loveless has toured with artists such as Old 97's, Drive-By Truckers, Jason Isbell, Iron & Wine, Scott H. Biram, and the Supersuckers. Her music has been praised by Rolling Stone, NPR, Pitchfork, SPIN, Stereogum, Chicago Tribune, and more.

Loveless penned an original song for the 2015 film I Smile Back, starring Sarah Silverman, and was the subject of the 2016 documentary Who Is Lydia Loveless?, directed by Gorman Bechard.
Charlie Worsham
Charlie Worsham
See Charlie Worsham on a stage and you immediately understand what he understood from the beginning: It's where he's meant to be. For him, music wasn't just a thing, it was the only thing. "I kind of feel like I didn't have much choice. The songs... the playing... those were the only things that ever really kept my attention." As a ridiculously talented multi-instrumentalist and student of great songs, he's developed a unique modern country sound built around the traditional acoustic instruments he grew up on.

Starting in his hometown of Grenada, Mississippi, Charlie was always out playing somewhere. From the Opry at age twelve to the local Missionary Baptist Church to the back-road blues joints he wasn't even supposed to know about, much less play in, wherever he found a stage, he played. And when he wasn't playing, he was listening to everything from Don Williams to Tom Petty to Earl Scruggs. With his energy and showmanship onstage and his understated Mississippi "yes sir" and "no ma'am" offstage, it's easy to understand why so many in Nashville's music community are rooting for him.

Charlie is currently writing and recording to finish out his major label debut album for Warner Music Nashville. After studying at Berklee School of Music in Boston, he moved South to Nashville. For the last two years, he's divided his time between writing songs, being an in-demand studio musician for other artists and playing his music live — sharing stages across the country with Taylor Swift, Miranda Lambert and others.
Venue Information:
City Hall Green
2415 6th Street
Meridian, MS, 39301